Take Your Guitar Lessons to a New Level

Posted by: Daniel R. Lehrman Posted in: Guitar Lessons

Every time I learn something new, it is a wonderful occasion. Especially when I’m playing my guitar. I find it difficult to place myself in any particular category, I’m not a beginner guitar player, it is yet to be determined if I’m a mid level intermediate guitar player or high level intermediate player, as opposed to a low level advanced player, all a matter of opinion. I’m not very hung up on such titles. As many of my readers know, I have 5 and a half years of electric guitar under my belt. The music I work so hard to play is very advanced, you know, Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan.

Everyday is a learning experience when you play the guitar. Do you think Jimi Hendrix was done evolving as a guitar player when he died young at 27 years old? Of course not. Eric Clapton is 65 years old [I think] and he is still developing. The challenge never ends. The rewards are greater the better player you are. They may come to you less often, but the rewards are greater and more satisfying.

I don’t give anyone in particular full credit for my skills. Except myself, for practicing and being tenacious. Remember, my thing is to make practice fun. Not a burden or work. With all of this being said, it is important to have quality instruction available. Guitar lessons for beginners are absolutely necessary, it’s very easy to learn incorrect techniques and habits in the beginning, which are hard to break. JamPlay has the best credentials of all of the online guitar lessons reviewed online. The best backing tracks, the best guitar tools, HD streaming video guitar lessons, and overall, an understandable easy to use guitar school.

I learn a lot of new stuff by mistake now. Every now and then I surprise myself. I make a maneuver or grab a chord, without conscious thought, that has a different voicing or is played on a different position on the neck, instinctively, without thought. For myself it’s the highest form of muscle memory. I use Jimi Hendrix scales by mistake.  I call them Jimi Hendrix scales because he played many scales in unusual places on the neck.  Jimi did not invent the scales.

Hendrix-Scale-1

In reality, you probably have to experience success at your given passion to know how good it feels to break another plateau. I use online guitar lessons for specific purposes, it’s easily worth less than 20 bucks a month as a reference. My main purpose is for backing tracks and rhythmical vibes. For me personally, studying any great or really good guitar player up close is a lesson. My only private electric guitar tutor was a great guitar player, make no mistake about it, Richard Mac was [RIP] a great player.

When I first started lessons, he had a gig one night a week. We, my wife and I, would visit where he was playing every week until the gig dried up. We always sat up front. Man, watching him play the guitar was a lesson in itself. His fingers were magic and his playing actually made a B quality band damn near an A quality band. Richard had the ability to pierce my soul when he played.

Richard is dead now. Some of the things he taught me that seemed well over my head at the time and did not sound like the finished product in the beginning, are becoming instinctive maneuvers now, 5 years later. He was an adequate teacher, but his teaching style went deeper than I understood at the time. He did not explain the moves to me, I don’t know for sure that he expected me to remember them and put them to use. But, it’s interesting that he taught me those maneuvers so early on, knowing it would take a hard worker 3 to 4 years to become proficient at them.

The payoff for me has been more than I ever expected. Never have I worked so hard for something and received more than I expected. The greater the challenge, the better success  feels. My rewards keep getting better, I want more. So I practice more. My advise is to pick out a few of your favorite songs and ask which ones are the easiest to learn the rhythm part to. If you learn the chords and practice the chord pattern to a backing track, it will become muscle memory. If you have a looper, you can play certain loops over and over.

I have Garage Band in my computer. I really don’t use much of it, I’m embarrassed to say. But t has a looper and slower downer. I can import one song, one backing track, or the whole iTunes play list if I want to. The Amazing X is also an excellent pay for looper and slower downer tool. I recommend a slower downer, it really helped me get familiar to, and learn to play many phrases or licks I needed to learn, as in the Stevie Ray Vaughan 5-4-1 Walk-Around from “Texas Flood” in this free guitar teaching video from YouTube.

When you finally come to the decision that you want to take guitar lessons, and make no mistake about it, no one can push you into taking lessons and becoming successful at it until you are ready. Then you really need to review the best online guitar lessons courses recommended on our site, perhaps get an unadvertised discount, only available from an affiliated marketer like myself, and save more money. GuitarPlayersCenter.com

 

 

2 Responses to Take Your Guitar Lessons to a New Level

  1. Sounds like you are well on your way. Garage band is great for that and the slow down tool really helps. I like what you said about getting into good habits early on.
    Ive not purchased any.guitar dvds etc for a while but a friend is looking at getting the Gibson tutorials and I wondered if you had tried it?

  2. I sure did start with easy guitar lessons and for some advance electric guitar lessons. I have long been wanting to start it but I keep pushing it aside. I am glad it finally took time to hone what I really love doing and now I can say I am way better compared to where I started. Proud to be a guitarist!

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