This is abrief and detailed review of triads. Now that my site redesign is done I will continue my guitar lesson reviews of music theory.

Triads are 3 note chords, they may also be referred to as a trichords. It sounds simple, but is anything but. A triad can be constructed out of the basic scale system. Seven basic notes produces 7 triads. There are four systems or types of triads which can be derived from a major or minor scale. Built from the Tertian system, a term used to explain harmony which was based upon the theory of the interval of the third. Tertian harmony is particularly common in Western music dating back to the Baroque era, through the nineteenth century.

1. Major. A major triad is the 1st, 3rd and 5th notes [degree] of the major scale. The lowest note, which is the beginning note of a triad is called the root note. The root note sets the tonally of the trichord. For instance an A major triad consists of {A} which is the 1st degree [root note], {C} which is the 3rd degree, {E} which is the 5th degree of the A major scale.

2. Minor. A minor triad consists of the 1st, 3rd and 5th degree if the minor scale. It’s important to remember we are using the minor scale system. Every note in the minor scale can be made into a trichord using the 1st, 3rd and 5th degree of the minor scale thus yielding 7 triads. The interval between the root note and 3rd note of a minor triad is called a minor 3rd. The interval between the root note [1st degree] and the 5th degree of  a minor scale is called a perfect 5th. The interval between the 3rd and 5th interval is called a Major 3rd.

3. Diminished. A diminished triad is another form of a triad with its own set of intervals. A diminished triad is made by either lowering the 5th degree/note of a minor triad one half of a chromatic step. Raising the root note and the 3rd [note] of a minor triad one half of a chromatic step also produces a diminished triad.

4. Augmented. An augmented triad can be created by raising the 5th note or degree of a major triad by one half of a chromatic step. Another way to create an augmented triad is to lower the root note and 3rd note or degree of a major triad by one half of a chromatic step thus creating an augmented triad. The interval between the root and 5th degree is presented as an augmented 5th. Note: An augmented triad may not exist as a basic triad.

At this point, we have seen triads created from almost every possible combination of thirds.

Roman numerals are commonly used to identify each scale degree.

1. Major triads may identified by capital roman numerals.

2. Minor triads are identified by lowercase roman numerals

3. Augmented triads may be identified by a + [plus sign] to the top right of the roman numeral.

4. Diminished triads may be identified by a tiny o [circle] to the top right of the roman numeral.

A detailed and brief guitar lesson reviews of the college course I took concerning the theory of music. If you are interested in learning more, contact me on my private guitar lessons with GPC page using the email address provided. And make sure you examine my fully new site look. Redesigned for your convenience. GPC.

7 Responses to Guitar Lesson Reviews of Triads Trichords

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  2. 3. Diminished. A diminished triad is another form of a triad with its own set of intervals. A diminished triad is made by either lowering the 5th degree/note of a minor triad one half of a chromatic step. Raising the root note and the 3rd [note] of a minor triad one half of a chromatic step also produces a diminished triad.

  3. somebody please help me here.All my life ive unrodsteod that a c major chord is composed of C,E,C.That’s 5h string 3rd fret(c) 4th string wnd fret(e) 2nd string 1st fret (c),so why does it say here (and on every page ive been too) that a c major chord has a g??Since when??i mean i was looking at chord construction pages just now and the chords come up all different than how i know them and how ive seen them on every book and chord chart.please some enlightening

  4. Maybe I can help, at 2:50 he talks about the notes from a Major Scale. What he chose was the C Major Scale. Which goes C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C with out any flats or sharps. If you nctoie on his white board he wrote C-E-G which are the 1st-3rd-5th. With this all you need to do now is google major scales and apply this practice to those. I hope this helped sorry that it took so long for someone to reply. You probably learned this in that time XD

  5. Triads are three note chords: They are formed by a Root (Tonic), a 3rd (Major or minor) and a 5th (perfect, diminished or augmented). Any chord may sound slightly different according to the position of the Root and yet have the same structure. This is mostly true with triads. When the Root is played at the bottom the triad is said to be in Root position. When the Root is played in the highest position after 3rd and 5th it is said to be the 1st inversion and when it’s played in between 5th and 3rd it’s called 2nd inversion. Any of these forms may fit better other preceding or following chords and sound more musical because of the better connection of the relative moving chord voicings.

  6. In this guitar lesson we are going to learn how minor guitar chords are made. First we will need to review how a major chord , or triad, is made. Once we have the major chord built, all we have to do is change one note to turn it in to a minor chord. If you are not familiar with intervals , you should go check out some of the other ear training and theory lessons . Try not to be frustrated if you don’t understand everything presented here the first time through. It is a lot of information.

  7. Now it is important that you know the root notes because knowing the root notes tells you where to place the triad shape. All you have to do is place the root note on the note that you want and it will be the correct shape.

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